Helping Someone with Depression - HelpGuide.org (2022)

depression

Your support and encouragement can play an important role in your loved one's recovery. Here's how to make a difference.

Helping Someone with Depression - HelpGuide.org (1)

How can I help someone with depression?

Depression is a serious but treatable disorder that affects millions of people, from young to old and from all walks of life. It gets in the way of everyday life, causing tremendous pain, hurting not just those suffering from it but also impacting everyone around them.

If someone you love is depressed, you may be experiencing any number of difficult emotions, including helplessness, frustration, anger, fear, guilt, and sadness.These feelings are all normal.It’s not easy dealing with a friend or family member’s depression. And if you neglect your own health, it can become overwhelming.

That said, your companionship and support can be crucial to your loved one’s recovery. You can help them to cope with depression symptoms, overcome negative thoughts, and regain their energy, optimism, and enjoyment of life. Start by learning all you can about depression and how to best talk about it with your friend or family member. But as you reach out, don’t forget to look after your own emotional health—you’ll need it to provide the full support your loved one needs.

Understanding depression in a friend or family member

Depression is a serious condition. Don't underestimate the seriousness of depression. Depression drains a person's energy, optimism, and motivation. Your depressed loved one can't just “snap out of it” by sheer force of will.

The symptoms of depression aren't personal. Depression makes it difficult for a person to connect on a deep emotional level with anyone, even the people they love the most. It's also common for depressed people to say hurtful things and lash out in anger. Remember that this is the depression talking, not your loved one, so try not to take it personally.

Hiding the problem won't make it go away.It doesn't help anyone involved if you try making excuses, covering up the problem, or lying for a friend or family member who is depressed. In fact, this may keep the depressed person from seeking treatment.

Your loved one isn't lazy or unmotivated.When you're suffering from depression, just thinking about doing the things that may help you to feel better can seem exhausting or impossible to put into action. Have patience as you encourage your loved one to take the first small steps to recovery.

You can't “fix” someone else's depression. As much as you may want to, you can't rescue someone from depression nor fix the problem for them. You're not to blame for your loved one's depression or responsible for their happiness (or lack thereof). While you can offer love and support, ultimately recovery is in the hands of the depressed person.

Recognizing depression symptoms in a loved one

Family and friends are often the first line of defense in the fight against depression. That's why it's important to understand the signs and symptoms of depression. You may notice the problem in a depressed loved one before they do, and your influence and concern can motivate them to seek help.

Be concerned if your loved one:

Doesn't seem to care about anything anymore. Has lost interest in work, sex, hobbies, and other pleasurable activities. Has withdrawn from friends, family, and other social activities.

Expresses a bleak or negative outlook on life. Is uncharacteristically sad, irritable, short-tempered, critical, or moody; talks about feeling “helpless” or “hopeless.”

Frequently complains of aches and pains such as headaches, stomach problems, and back pain. Or complains of feeling tired and drained all the time.

Sleeps less than usual or oversleeps. Has become indecisive, forgetful, disorganized, and “out of it.”

Eats more or less than usual, and has recently gained or lost weight.

Drinks more or abuses drugs, including prescription sleeping pills and painkillers, as a way to self-medicate how they're feeling.

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(Video) How to (Actually) Help Someone Who's Depressed

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How to talk to someone about depression

Sometimes it is hard to know what to say when speaking to someone about depression. You might fear that if you bring up your worries the person will get angry, feel insulted, or ignore your concerns. You may be unsure what questions to ask or how to be supportive.

(Video) My Mental Health Story

If you don't know where to start, the following suggestions may help. But remember that being a compassionate listener is much more important than giving advice. You don't have to try to “fix” your friend or family member; you just have to be a good listener. Often, the simple act of talking face to face can be an enormous help to someone suffering from depression. Encourage the depressed person to talk about their feelings, and be willing to listen without judgment.

Don't expect a single conversation to be the end of it. Depressed people tend to withdraw from others and isolate themselves. You may need to express your concern and willingness to listen over and over again. Be gentle, yet persistent.

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Starting the conversation

Finding a way to start a conversation about depression with your loved one is always the hardest part. You could try saying:

  • “I have been feeling concerned about you lately.”
  • “Recently, I have noticed some differences in you and wondered how you are doing.”
  • “I wanted to check in with you because you have seemed pretty down lately.”

Once you're talking, you can ask questions such as:

  • “When did you begin feeling like this?”
  • “Did something happen that made you start feeling this way?”
  • “How can I best support you right now?”
  • “Have you thought about getting help?”

Remember, being supportive involves offering encouragement and hope. Very often, this is a matter of talking to the person in language that they will understand and can respond to while in a depressed state of mind.

Tips for Talking about Depression
What you CAN say that helps:
  • “You’re not alone. I’m here for you during this tough time.”
  • “It may be hard to believe right now, but the way you’re feeling will change.”
  • “Please tell me what I can do now to help you.”
  • “Even if I’m not able to understand exactly how you feel, I care about you and want to help.”
  • “You’re important to me. Your life is important to me.”
  • “When you want to give up, tell yourself you will hold on for just one more day, hour, or minute—whatever you can manage.”
What you should AVOID saying:
  • “This is all in your head”
  • “Everyone goes through tough times.”
  • “Try to look on the bright side.”
  • “Why do you want to die when you have so much to live for?”
  • “I can't do anything about your situation.”
  • “Just snap out of it.”
  • “You should be feeling better by now.”

The risk of suicide is real

What to do in a crisis situation

If you believe your loved one is at an immediate risk for suicide, do NOT leave them alone.

In the U.S., dial 911 or call the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline at 988.

In other countries, call your country's emergency services number or visit IASP to find a suicide prevention helpline.

It may be hard to believe that the person you know and love would ever consider something as drastic as suicide, but a depressed person may not see any other way out. Depression clouds judgment and distorts thinking, causing a normally rational person to believe that death is the only way to end the pain they're feeling.

Since suicide is a very real danger when someone is depressed, it's important to know the warning signs:

  • Talking about suicide, dying, or harming oneself; a preoccupation with death
  • Expressing feelings of hopelessness or self-hate
  • Acting in dangerous or self-destructive ways
  • Getting affairs in order and saying goodbye
  • Seeking out pills, weapons, or other lethal objects
  • A sudden sense of calm after depression

If you think a friend or family member might be considering suicide, don't wait, talk to them about your concerns. Many people feel uncomfortable bringing up the topic but it is one of the best things you can do for someone who is thinking about suicide. Talking openly about suicidal thoughts and feelings can save a person's life, so speak up if you're concerned and seek professional help immediately!

Encouraging the person to get help

While you can't control someone else's recovery from depression, you can start by encouraging the depressed person to seek help. Getting a depressed person into treatment can be difficult. Depression saps energy and motivation, so even the act of making an appointment or finding a doctor can seem daunting to your loved one. Depression also involves negative ways of thinking. The depressed person may believe that the situation is hopeless and treatment pointless.

Because of these obstacles, getting your loved one to admit to the problem—and helping them see that it can be solved—is an essential step in depression recovery.

If your friend or family member resists getting help:

Suggest a general check-up with a physician. Your loved one may be less anxious about seeing a family doctor than a mental health professional. A regular doctor's visit is actually a great option, since the doctor can rule out medical causes of depression. If the doctor diagnoses depression, they can refer your loved one to a psychiatrist or psychologist. Sometimes, this “professional” opinion makes all the difference.

Offer to help the depressed person find a doctor or therapist and go with them on the first visit. Finding the right treatment provider can be difficult, and is often a trial-and-error process. For a depressed person already low on energy, it is a huge help to have assistance making calls and looking into the options.

(Video) how to talk to someone with depression (do’s & don’t) 🤍

Encourage your loved one to make a thorough list of symptoms and ailments to discuss with the doctor. You can even bring up things that you have noticed as an outside observer, such as, “You seem to feel much worse in the mornings,” or “You always get stomach pains before work.”

Supporting your loved one's treatment

One of the most important things you can do to help a friend or relative with depression is to give your unconditional love and support throughout the treatment process. This involves being compassionate and patient, which is not always easy when dealing with the negativity, hostility, and moodiness that go hand in hand with depression.

Provide whatever assistance the person needs (and is willing to accept). Help your loved one make and keep appointments, research treatment options, and stay on schedule with any treatment prescribed.

Have realistic expectations. It can be frustrating to watch a depressed friend or family member struggle, especially if progress is slow or stalled. Having patience is important. Even with optimal treatment, recovery from depression doesn't happen overnight.

Lead by example. Encourage the person to lead a healthier, mood-boosting lifestyle by doing it yourself: maintain a positive outlook, eat better, avoid alcohol and drugs, exercise, and lean on others for support.

Encourage activity. Invite your loved one to join you in uplifting activities, like going to a funny movie or having dinner at a favorite restaurant. Exercise is especially helpful, so try to get your depressed loved one moving. Going on walks together is one of the easiest options. Be gently and lovingly persistent—don't get discouraged or stop asking.

Pitch in when possible. Seemingly small tasks can be very hard for someone with depression to manage. Offer to help out with household responsibilities or chores, but only do what you can without getting burned out yourself!

Taking care of yourself

There's a natural impulse to want to fix the problems of people we care about, but you can't control someone else's depression. You can, however, control how well you take care of yourself. It's just as important for you to stay healthy as it is for the depressed person to get treatment, so make your own well-being a priority.

Remember the advice of airline flight attendants: put on your own oxygen mask before you assist anyone else. In other words, make sure your own health and happiness are solid before you try to help someone who is depressed. You won't do your friend or family member any good if you collapse under the pressure of trying to help. When your own needs are taken care of, you'll have the energy you need to lend a helping hand.

Speak up for yourself. You may be hesitant to speak out when the depressed person in your life upsets you or lets you down. However, honest communication will actually help the relationship in the long run. If you're suffering in silence and letting resentment build, your loved one will pick up on these negative emotions and feel even worse. Gently talk about how you're feeling before pent-up emotions make it too hard to communicate with sensitivity.

Set boundaries. Of course you want to help, but you can only do so much. Your own health will suffer if you let your life be controlled by your loved one's depression. You can't be a caretaker round the clock without paying a psychological price. To avoid burnout and resentment, set clear limits on what you are willing and able to do. You are not your loved one's therapist, so don't take on that responsibility.

Stay on track with your own life. While some changes in your daily routine may be unavoidable while caring for your friend or relative, do your best to keep appointments and plans with friends. If your depressed loved one is unable to go on an outing or trip you had planned, ask a friend to join you instead.

Seek support. You are NOT betraying your depressed relative or friend by turning to others for support. Joining a support group, talking to a counselor or clergyman, or confiding in a trusted friend will help you get through this tough time. You don't need to go into detail about your loved one's depression or betray confidences; instead focus on your emotions and what you are feeling. Make sure you can be totally honest with the person you turn to—choose someone who will listen without interruption and without judging you.

Authors: Melinda Smith, M.A., Lawrence Robinson, and Jeanne Segal, Ph.D.

Get more help

Helping Someone Receive Treatment – What to do (and not to do) when trying to help a loved one get help for depression. (Families for Depression Awareness)

Helping a Friend or Family Member with Depression or Bipolar Disorder – Downloadable brochure with tips for helping your loved one while also taking care of yourself. (Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance)

What is the role of the family caregiver? – Tips on how families can work together to manage depression treatment. (Families for Depression Awareness)

How to Help Someone in Crisis – Advice on how to deal with a depression crisis, including situations where hospitalization is necessary. (Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance)

Depression hotlines, suicide prevention help

Depression hotlines

In the U.S.: Find DBSA Chapters/Support Groupsor call the NAMI Helplinefor support and referrals at 1-800-950-6264

UK: Find Depression support groups in-person and online or call the Mind Infoline at 0300 123 3393

Australia: Call the SANE HelpCentreat 1800 18 7263

Canada:CallMood Disorders Society of Canadaat 613-921-5565

India:Call the Vandrevala FoundationHelpline (India)at 1860 2662 345 or 1800 2333 330

Suicide prevention help

In the U.S.: Call 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifelineat 988

UK and Ireland: Call Samaritans UKat 116 123

Australia: Call Lifeline Australiaat 13 11 14

Canada: FindCrisis Centers Across Canadaby province.

Other countries: Visit IASPor Suicide.orgto find a helpline near you

(Video) MCOM 612 Beating the Blues With Peer Education

Around the web

Last updated: October 21, 2022

FAQs

Is HelpGuide credible? ›

Transparency You Can Trust

HelpGuide is recognized by Guidestar as a financially accountable and transparent organization.

What helps people cope with depression? ›

How to cope with depression
  • Stay in touch. Don't withdraw from life. ...
  • Be more active. Take up some form of exercise. ...
  • Face your fears. Don't avoid the things you find difficult. ...
  • Don't drink too much alcohol. For some people, alcohol can become a problem. ...
  • Try to eat a healthy diet. ...
  • Have a routine.

How do you help someone who doesn't want to be helped? ›

What to do when they don't want help
  1. Listen and validate. If your relationship is iffy, it doesn't hurt to just listen. ...
  2. Ask questions. Ask your loved one what they want! ...
  3. Resist the urge to fix or give advice. ...
  4. Explore options together. ...
  5. Take care of yourself and find your own support.

What are three strategies for coping with mild depression? ›

Here are 5 self-help strategies for depression:
  • Exercise. Both aerobic exercise like walking or jogging and anaerobic exercise like weight lifting can help alleviate symptoms of depression.
  • Relaxation training. ...
  • Light therapy. ...
  • Self-help books based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). ...
  • Computerized therapy.
Jul 2, 2018

What is the best mental health website? ›

The MOST RECOMMENDED Mental Health Websites in 2022
  • Educational Resources. One of the best things any mental health website can offer is resources. ...
  • Connection with Others. ...
  • The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) ...
  • Psych Central. ...
  • Headspace. ...
  • VeryWell Mind. ...
  • BetterHelp. ...
  • The Mighty.
Jun 16, 2022

Who is the publisher of HelpGuide org? ›

HelpGuide started out as a joint project between The Rotary Club of Santa Monica and the Center for Healthy Aging. It has since grown into an international community with visitors from over 140 countries. In 2012, the organization partnered with Harvard Health Publishing to include some of its research and articles.

What is the fastest way to treat depression? ›

As you start to feel better, you can add more challenging daily goals.
  1. Exercise. It temporarily boosts feel-good chemicals called endorphins. ...
  2. Eat healthy. ...
  3. Get enough sleep. ...
  4. Challenge negative thoughts. ...
  5. Check with your doctor before using supplements. ...
  6. Do something new. ...
  7. Avoid alcohol and other drugs.
Oct 1, 2021

What are the 5 types of coping strategies? ›

There are many different conceptualizations of coping strategies, but the five general types of coping strategies are problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping, social support, religious coping, and meaning making.

How do you support a person? ›

Examples of emotional support
  1. give the other their undivided attention.
  2. allow them to say what they feel without judgement.
  3. ask questions to clarify or better understand their experiences.
  4. verbally summarize or reflect on what they have said.
Apr 27, 2022

When should you stop helping someone? ›

If assisting someone else is overtaxing your time, energy, or resources—stop! Even if you agreed to do something, if the cost becomes too great, whether that's financial or emotional, you can back out or adjust how much you can help. If you are harming yourself, that is not helping.

How do you help a mentally ill person who doesn't want it? ›

What emotional support can I offer?
  1. Listen. Simply giving someone space to talk, and listening to how they're feeling, can be really helpful in itself. ...
  2. Offer reassurance. Seeking help can feel lonely, and sometimes scary. ...
  3. Stay calm. ...
  4. Be patient. ...
  5. Try not to make assumptions. ...
  6. Keep social contact.

How do you get someone mental help if they don't want it? ›

Fortunately, there are several ways of getting mental help for someone who doesn't want it without forcing or cornering them.
  1. Listen and Validate Their Feelings. ...
  2. Ask Questions. ...
  3. Resist the Urge to Fix or Give Advice. ...
  4. Explore Options Together. ...
  5. Find Support for Yourself.
May 31, 2022

What has been proven to help with depression? ›

CBT has been found to be one of the more effective treatments for depression. CBT is generally delivered by a trained psychologist. Talk to your GP about whether this is an option for you. Many online therapies are based on CBT principles.

Does crying relieve stress? ›

Many people associate crying with feeling sad and making them feel worse, but in reality, crying can help improve your mood - emotional tears release stress hormones. Your stress level lowers when you cry, which can help you sleep better and strengthen your immune system.

Does mindfulness work for depression? ›

Studies have suggested that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy is just as effective as medication in preventing depression relapse among adults with a history of recurrent depression, and in reducing depressive symptoms among those with active depression.

What to say to someone who is struggling emotionally? ›

"I'm really sorry you're going through this. I'm here for you if you need me." Remind them that their feelings are valid and that you want to support them.

Where can I talk to someone about my problems online for free? ›

I. The 5 Best Free Online Therapy Chats of 2022
  • eTherapyPro— Best Overall.
  • 7 Cups— Best for Peer Support.
  • Free Online Therapy— Best for a Free Assessment.
  • BlahTherapy— Best for Emotional Support.
  • TalkwithStranger!— Best for Anonymity.
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Is there a number to text just to talk to someone? ›

In crisis and need to talk to someone? We're here for you. Text HOME to 741741 to reach a volunteer Crisis Counselor.

What do you do when you need help? ›

Crisis Lines and Help Lines

In the United States, call 988 for free and confidential support if you are in distress or crisis. If you are experiencing a medical emergency then you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

What can you do to help? ›

Here's an extremely incomplete list, just to get you thinking — I'm sure you can come up with thousands more if you think about it.
  1. Smile and be friendly. ...
  2. Call a charity to volunteer. ...
  3. Donate something you don't use. ...
  4. Make a donation. ...
  5. Redirect gifts. ...
  6. Stop to help. ...
  7. Teach. ...
  8. Comfort someone in grief.

Who is Melinda Smith Ma? ›

Melinda sets the strategic vision for HelpGuide and oversees content operations and organizational outreach and development.

How do you overcome depression and overthinking? ›

Tips for addressing ruminating thoughts
  1. Distract yourself. When you realize you're starting to ruminate, finding a distraction can break your thought cycle. ...
  2. Plan to take action. ...
  3. Take action. ...
  4. Question your thoughts. ...
  5. Readjust your life's goals. ...
  6. Work on enhancing your self-esteem. ...
  7. Try meditation. ...
  8. Understand your triggers.
Nov 15, 2019

Is depression curable or just treatable? ›

There's no cure for depression, but there are lots of effective treatments. People can recover from depression and live long and healthy lives.

How do people develop depression? ›

There's no single cause of depression. It can occur for a variety of reasons and it has many different triggers. For some people, an upsetting or stressful life event, such as bereavement, divorce, illness, redundancy and job or money worries, can be the cause. Different causes can often combine to trigger depression.

What are the 5 positive coping skills? ›

What are some common coping strategies?
  • Lower your expectations.
  • Ask others to help or assist you.
  • Take responsibility for the situation.
  • Engage in problem solving.
  • Maintain emotionally supportive relationships.
  • Maintain emotional composure or, alternatively, expressing distressing emotions.
Nov 24, 2020

What are 10 coping skills? ›

Top 10 Coping Skills
  • Deep Breathing. Often when faced with a stressful situation or feeling, our breathing changes. ...
  • Writing. Writing can be an effective means of working through stress. ...
  • Physical Activity. ...
  • Self-Talk. ...
  • Art. ...
  • Meditation. ...
  • Puzzles. ...
  • Music.
Oct 22, 2019

What are 3 examples of healthy coping strategies? ›

Healthy Coping Mechanisms and Tools
  • Meditating.
  • Stretching.
  • Engaging in progressive muscle relaxation.
  • Listening to music.
  • Aerobic exercise.
  • Watching television.
  • Going to the movies.
  • Reading.
Oct 28, 2017

What to say to someone who is struggling with life? ›

We want to help her feel better. We want to help her find the right help.
...
What to say:
  • Your feelings aren't too big for me.
  • You don't have to show up any specific way for me.
  • You're not weak or crazy or not normal.
  • I'm sorry you're feeling this way. I'm here with you.
  • This is really big.
Mar 14, 2022

How do you help someone going through a tough time? ›

For someone going through a tough time, one of the most helpful things you can do is listen.
...
Listen with compassion
  1. approach them and let them know you're there.
  2. find a suitable time and place to talk to them.
  3. ask questions about their experience.
Dec 19, 2018

What to say to a friend who is struggling? ›

A good framework for replying to your friend's troubles is: summarize what they're going through, from your perspective. validate how they feel about what they're going through. ask how you can help (or express that you know nothing will really help, but you want to be there for your friend through the pain)

Should you help someone who doesn't want to help themselves? ›

Continue to be supportive.

Ways that you can do this are providing them with assistance if needed like taking them to or from treatment and helping them with daily chores. You could also encourage activities like exercise, going out to dinner with friends, or watching a funny movie. Most importantly, don't avoid them.

What's the difference between helping and enabling? ›

In the simplest of terms, support is helping someone do something that they could do themselves in the right conditions, while enabling is stepping in and mitigating consequences that would otherwise be a result of negative choices.

Should I feel guilty for not helping someone? ›

In high-responsibility situations, people should anticipate feeling strong guilt if not helping but weak warm glow if helping. On the other hand, in low-responsibility situations people should anticipate feeling weak guilt if not helping but strong warm glow if helping.

What are signs of being mentally unstable? ›

Symptoms
  • Feeling sad or down.
  • Confused thinking or reduced ability to concentrate.
  • Excessive fears or worries, or extreme feelings of guilt.
  • Extreme mood changes of highs and lows.
  • Withdrawal from friends and activities.
  • Significant tiredness, low energy or problems sleeping.
Jun 8, 2019

What is a psychotic break? ›

This is a psychotic break — when someone loses touch with reality, experiencing delusions (false beliefs) or hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not there) and what's called “disorganized” speech.

What to do if you think a family member is mentally ill? ›

If you, or a family member, needs help with a mental or substance use disorder, call SAMHSA's National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or TTY: 1-800-487-4889, or text your zip code to 435748 (HELP4U), or use SAMHSA's Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator to get help.

Can't help people who don't want to be helped? ›

You cannot help someone who is not ready to accept the help; or worse does not believe they need help in the first place. Let people grow on their own level. Don't try to pull them up just because you can. Your intention may be helping but in reality you are changing their path.

What is a 5150 hold? ›

5150 is the number of the section of the Welfare and Institutions Code, which allows an adult who is experiencing a mental health crisis to be involuntarily detained for a 72- hour psychiatric hospitalization when evaluated to be a danger to others, or to himself or herself, or gravely disabled.

What can trigger a psychotic episode? ›

Psychosis could be triggered by a number of things, such as: Physical illness or injury. You may see or hear things if you have a high fever, head injury, or lead or mercury poisoning. If you have Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease you may also experience hallucinations or delusions.

What are the 3 basic approaches to treating depression? ›

Three of the more common methods used in depression treatment include cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, and psychodynamic therapy. Often, a blended approach is used.

What therapy is most successful in treating depression? ›

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT)

This form of therapy is considered by many to be the gold standard in depression treatment.

What is the most common symptom of depressive disorders? ›

While each person may experience symptoms differently, these are the most common symptoms of depression:
  • Lasting sad, anxious, or “empty” mood.
  • Loss of interest in almost all activities.
  • Appetite and weight changes.
  • Changes in sleep patterns, such as inability to sleep or sleeping too much.

Is it better to cry or hold it in? ›

You'll feel better afterwards

When you cry for emotional reasons, those tears contain stress hormones that help relieve the body of stress-induced chemicals.

What are 5 emotional signs of stress? ›

Mental or behavioral symptoms include:
  • Being more emotional than usual.
  • Feeling overwhelmed or on edge.
  • Trouble keeping track of things or remembering.
  • Trouble making decisions, solving problems, concentrating, getting your work done.
  • Using alcohol or drugs to relieve your emotional stress.
Dec 29, 2020

Which hormone is responsible for stress? ›

Cortisol, the primary stress hormone, increases sugars (glucose) in the bloodstream, enhances your brain's use of glucose and increases the availability of substances that repair tissues.

What happens to the brain during meditation? ›

Quick Read Demystifying meditation

It can strengthen areas of your brain responsible for memory, learning, attention and self-awareness. The practice can also help calm down your sympathetic nervous system. Over time, mindfulness meditation can increase cognition, memory and attention.

What causes anxiety in the brain? ›

Anxiety happens when a part of the brain, the amygdala, senses trouble. When it senses threat, real or imagined, it surges the body with hormones (including cortisol, the stress hormone) and adrenaline to make the body strong, fast and powerful.

Who is Melinda Smith Ma? ›

Melinda sets the strategic vision for HelpGuide and oversees content operations and organizational outreach and development.

Does social media negatively affect mental health? ›

Research studies note the connection between use of social media and its undesirable outcomes that increase incidence of anxiety, stress, depression, body image concerns, and loneliness in teens and young adults (APA, 2022).

Who is Melinda Smith ATO? ›

Melinda Smith was appointed Chief Service Delivery Officer in October 2016. In this role, Melinda leads the Service Delivery Group which is responsible for a broad range of the ATO's foundation services for all segments of the community.

How does depression occur? ›

There's no single cause of depression. It can occur for a variety of reasons and it has many different triggers. For some people, an upsetting or stressful life event, such as bereavement, divorce, illness, redundancy and job or money worries, can be the cause. Different causes can often combine to trigger depression.

What do you call someone who doesn't use social media? ›

A funny term for it is Luddite.

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