Media and Broadcast Production (MA) | Courses | Queen's University Belfast (2022)

This MA is an intensive programme providing you with a solid foundation in media-based storytelling by combining in-depth research methods with a practical, hands-on approach to learning. It will teach you how to record and edit in audio and video formats; how to research, produce, script and edit your own material, whether it is short features or long-form documentary; and how to produce stories for radio, TV and interactive online platforms. To do this, you’ll also learn effective interviewing techniques. This MA will teach you how to identify a good story and then how to research and pitch it for a successful commissioning outcome.

Whether you want to be a broadcast journalist, a radio or podcast producer, a videographer, a documentary filmmaker, a media production/communications specialist, a post-production editor or immersive media practitioner, our practice-centred approach will strategically position you to work for any aspect of radio or podcasting; factual TV; documentary and informational production. On completing this MA, you will have numerous factual media outputs under your belt in radio/podcast, TV, documentary, interactive and experimental hybrid formats. This will be the basis of a robust work portfolio with which you can then enter the work market.

The programme is designed to appeal to graduate students in the Humanities and Social Sciences, particularly those with backgrounds in English, politics, history, journalism, cultural studies, and creative writing. Previous academic study of or practical experience in areas of the media is beneficial but not essential. This would also interest those from other disciplines who want to retrain and have already had some relevant media industry experience.

Media and Broadcast Production highlights

Industry Links

  • We have strong links to the BBC and relationships with local and global media organisations. We have industry professionals as guest speakers, both from Northern Ireland as well as internationally: foreign correspondents, award-winning directors and producers, photographers, editors or script writers. Students can take part in a range of talks, events and have regular opportunities to engage with the vibrant media scene in Northern Ireland and the international media landscape.

Career Development

  • Students will use equipment and facilities acquired and designed in collaboration with BBC NI and other industry representatives. The Media and Broadcast MA is taught from the Sonic Arts Research Centre, the home of the world-renowned Sonic Lab. Students have opportunities to explore hybrid forms of storytelling using industry-level cameras, editing software and facilities.

World Class Facilities

  • Based in the School of Arts, English and Languages, the MA in Media and Broadcast Production offers a robust, hands-on production experience combined with rigorous academic research, enabling students to leave with a rich portfolio of self-produced, shot and edited factual stories in audio and video formats; radio and TV documentaries; and thorough understanding of modern media and broadcast landscapes.

Student Experience

  • Students are encouraged to develop their own interests throughout the degree, guided by the staff, whose expertise is wide-ranging, covering broadcast journalism, factual (audio and video) documentary production, hybrid storytelling, interactive media, virtual reality, media research & analysis and communications.
    https://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/careers/ImproveYourEmployability/StudentCareerStories/CarolineMcEvoy/

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Course content

Course Structure

Full Time;
Semester One: Three compulsory modules
Semester Two: Two compulsory modules and one optional
Summer: Dissertation

Part Time;
Year One, Semester One: Two compulsory modules
Year One, Semester Two: One module
Year Two, Semester One: One compulsory module
Year Two, Semester Two: Two modules
Year Three, September to May: Dissertation

Course DetailsAll modules are subject to change and availability. Listings here should be taken as indicative.

Core Modules:

Media and Broadcast Analysis
This module introduces students to the academic analysis of broadcasting and media. In doing so, the aim is to provide students with an understanding of a range of different methods for conducting their own research, and for understanding other academics' research. Through considering these ideas and elements, students should develop their understanding of the media and broadcast environment in ways that aid their practical work as well as allowing them to consider how their own work, as well as that of others, can be interpreted by different audiences. Students should provide their own examples of programming and material, but will also be supplied with examples, including archival material, audience research etc.

Hybrid Storytelling
Hybrid Storytelling studies various creative responses to the rise and development of misinformation, image, and sound manipulation, ‘post-truth’ or ‘alternative reality’ discourse. Students will create their own hybrid story forms that can bolster the factual thrust of projects and serve as an antidote to disinformation, acting as an essential primer for students entering the contemporary broadcast industry. This module is an equally balanced combination of theory and practice which enables students to build on and interrogate broadcast approaches students have a knowledge of through either their own media practice or media consumption.

Broadcast Journalism
This module explores theoretical concepts relating to journalism while developing each student’s own journalistic craft through workshop-based practice. It empowers students to work independently as journalists and produce their own news/feature radio and television outputs. Students will be brought through the process of producing packages from pitch and strong story conceptualisation, effective interviewing, scripting and the final edit. This module also teaches the regulatory and ethical framework surrounding broadcast journalism.

Documentary Practice
This practice-based module combines the skills needed for you to produce a character-driven, narrative and sound-rich long form audio or audiovisual project. Students will learn how to orient their storytelling practice for a conventional documentary slot on radio or TV, incorporating interview clips, soundbites and sound design along the way. The module also examines the ethics and processes involved in producing a documentary. With this background knowledge under your belt, you'll move through the production process of your own project: from the initial idea, through the gathering of material, to scripting and editing. Students will be encouraged to become informed practitioners, aware of the commissioning structures and current industry standards, yet capable of reflecting critically on their own practice.

Broadcasting Genre
This module examines the uses and significance of genre in broadcasting. It covers theories of genre, the relationships between genre in different media (including literature and cinema), and the uses of genre by broadcasters, producers and audiences. Through the module, students will develop their own case studies focusing on a genre of their choice, practicing and enhancing their independent research skills as they build their individual assessed project. They will engage with questions around how genres are formed and used, why people categorise things in genres, how genres interact with policy and taste formations, and how generic descriptions and canons change over time.

Interactive Media
This module introduces the production of interactive and non-linear forms of new media as emergent alternatives to traditional linear forms of media. New media is explored through both a practical exploration of interactive formats; and by considering critical debates around aesthetics, power, force, significance and form in a series of new media texts, artefacts and systems. The module situates practices in an environment that is ceaselessly evolving and explores new technologies such as virtual reality, immersive media and interactive documentary for web/mobile devices. This module offers a practical introduction to software authoring tools and an exploration of disruptive new technologies as they emerge.

Media and Broadcast Production Dissertation
Each student will develop and produce a dissertation based on a topic which they select, in consultation with their supervisor. The Media and Broadcast Production dissertation may take the form of a practice based (TV or radio documentary, podcast, etc.) output with associated reflective statement, or a traditional academic dissertation. Students will undertake their dissertation work independently over the summer, supported by their supervisor.

People teaching you

Dr Derek Johnston

Lecturer in Broadcast

SAEL
Email: derek.johnston@qub.ac.uk

Dr Don Duncan

Lecturer in Broadcast Journalism

SAEL
Email: don.duncan@qub.ac.uk

Dr Elena Caoduro

Lecturer in Media Analysis

SAEL
Email: elena.caoduro@qub.ac.uk

Dr John D'Arcy

Lecturer in Digital Media

SAEL
Email: j.darcy@qub.ac.uk

Mr Frank Delaney

Subject Lead Broadcast Production

SAEL
Email: f.delaney@qub.ac.uk

Mrs Gabriela Matthews

Senior Lecturer in Broadcast Journalism

SAEL
Email: g.matthews@qub.ac.uk

Contact Teaching Hours

Medium Group Teaching
3 (hours maximum)
Most modules consist of ten weeks of seminars or workshops, each session lasting two to three hours per module.
Small Group Teaching/Personal Tutorial
0 (hours maximum)
Students are encouraged to consult with their module tutors outside of class time, especially in developing their individual interests and projects, including assessed work.

Teaching Times

Most teaching will take place Monday to Friday,9am-6pm. Occasional events, usually optional, may take place outside of this. Students will also have to find time for independent study and for undertaking group work, particularly on practical modules.

Career Prospects

Introduction
This programme is designed to offer a range of highly useful skills, experience and understanding regarding broadcasting and contemporary media, which are useful in a range of careers, including broadcasting, journalism, marketing, press and public relations, advertising and teaching. Some students choose to continue their studies to PhD level on a chosen specialised topic in Media and Broadcast Production.
http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/careers/

Employment Links
Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.

Learning and Teaching

As a combined practical and analytical degree, students will engage with several different types of learning and teaching through this programme.

Independent learning

Core to the Masters programme is the development of skills of independent learning, picking up from those acquired at undergraduate level. Students are expected to guide their own studies based on their own interests, in consultation with the academic staff. This includes self-directed research, development of individual research projects and responsibility for reading and acquiring knowledge around the subject, in addition to set research tasks and academic reading.

Online learning

Learning is supported by a range of online resources and tasks, organised through our Virtual Learning Environment, Canvas. This can include provision of guidance on tasks, supplementary information and reference material, quizzes and self-tests, as well as formative and summative assessments.

Practice

Practical work involves engaging with a range of tasks outside of scheduled class time, including setting up and conducting interviews, recording material, planning and developing projects. Much of this work will be conducted in small groups

Seminars

Some sessions will be taught as seminars, working in small groups to discuss particular topics.

Skill Labs

Skill labs will be available weekly for students to deepen their practice skills, whether in camera work, sound harvesting for Radio, or editing.

Workshops

The practical aspects of the degree are largely taught through workshops, combining hands-on practice with discussion of the underlying concepts and appropriate techniques. These are typically taught in our audio studio, television studio or edit suite.

Assessment

Assessments associated with the course are outlined below:

Written assignments

Practical assignments, accompanied by a reflective essay

Facilities

Students on the MA Media and Broadcast Production have access to a range of facilities to support their practice work and their academic learning. These include the University’s famous McClay Library for research resources and the Graduate School, for its opportunities to engage with a range of fellow graduate students or to receive research training and support. Specific facilities to support practice work include a Computer Lab, the Sonic Lab and Edit Suite, with 24-hour access and use of industry-standard editing software for audio and video. Students have at their disposal the newly constructed audio and television studios, utilising high-end industry-standard cameras. Industry-standard camera kits for mobile journalism or advanced video-journalism kits are available for students to use throughout their time at Queens. VR and AR cameras and equipment are also available for students to experiment with.

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Overview

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Modules

Modules

The information below is intended as an example only, featuring module details for the current year of study (2022/23). Modules are reviewed on an annual basis and may be subject to future changes – revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year.

  • Year 1

    Core Modules

    Documentary Practice (20 credits)

    (Video) BA Broadcast Production

    Documentary Practice

    Overview

    This module develops the skills needed for students to produce a character-focussed, narrative-driven, industry-standard documentary or series of mini-documentaries suitable for broadcast. The work will draw on documentary and story theory to incorporate narration, interviews, natural sound, sequence and scene building, and sound design. The module takes students through the production process from the initial idea to pitch to project design, material gathering, scripting, editing and final export. Media ethics and regulation is a core part of documentary practice as it is learned on this module. Keen attention is given to various administrative processes associated with documentary production. The module also examines the history of the documentary form and analyses various evolutions and developments in the form.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completing this module, students should be able to:
    Understand the nature of long form, documentary storytelling
    Turn an idea into an effective piece longer form narrative storytelling that adheres to broadcast documentary conventions
    Record and edit a documentary that adheres to current broadcast documentary conventions
    Write, communicate and edit in a team environment
    Understand and adhere to the ethical and regulatory frameworks circumscribing factual broadcasting

    Skills

    This module will help develop the following skills:
    Story ideation
    Project Pitching
    Teamwork on media projects
    Longer form broadcast storytelling
    Broadcast writing
    Story structuring
    Audio and/or video editing conventions

    Coursework

    40%

    Examination

    0%

    Practical

    60%

    Credits

    20

    Hybrid Storytelling (20 credits)

    Hybrid Storytelling

    Overview

    Misinformation, image and sound manipulation and “post-truth” discourses all pose increasingly significant threats to the status of fact and factual media and the democratic culture it underpins in Western societies.
    The development of these practices have bred deep suspicion and a burgeoning rejection of the observational mode of storytelling, a staple of conventional audio and audio-visual factual media.
    This module is intended to do two things:
    1) Study the rise and development of misinformation, image and sound manipulation and “post-truth” discourses and act as an essential primer on these developments for students entering the contemporary broadcast industry
    2) Study various creative responses – primarily hybrid story forms – that can serve as antidotes to the above threats by bolstering the factual thrust of projects they are working on
    This module is intended as an equally balanced hybrid of theory and practice, which enables students to build on and interrogate broadcast skills they know well through either media practice or media consumption Students will engage with theory in the following area: documentary studies, postmodernism semiotics, post-structuralism, post-truth discourse, narratology and genre experimentation, among others.
    They will be exposed to examples of audio and audio-visual work which exemplifies creative responses to misinformation, notably hybrid forms where fiction (or fictive strategies) is commandeered in the service of strengthening of the veracity of factual information for audiences living in our “post-truth” era.
    Students will have the opportunity to develop and apply some of these strategies in their own factual broadcast practical work on the module. They will also have the opportunity, through written work, to demonstrate their ability to critically analyse concepts covered during the course of the module.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify, understand and critique misinformation, image and sound manipulation, and “post-truth” discourse and techniques; their effect on factual media and society; and the larger societal stakes that surround its emergence.
    Analyse media texts in relation to their attributes that are clearly fact-based and those which are fiction-based.
    Analyse fiction-based attributes embedded within larger factual outputs and discern if specific fiction-based attributes are beneficial or detrimental to the veracity of the output and, by extension, in the public interest.
    Create a hybrid output that draws on learning from the module

    Skills

    By the end of this module, students should be able to:
    Develop and activate both academic and practical skills
    Acquire, deepen and implement media literacy, particularly with regards to fact, fiction, misinformation and dissimulation
    Develop and activate core academic skills such as research, analysis and communication through class work, independent research and assessed work
    Develop and activate core practice-based skills such as: devising and producing creative hybrids that strengthen the factual thrust of a project Advance their academic research skills

    Coursework

    50%

    Examination

    0%

    Practical

    50%

    Credits

    20

    Module Code

    BCP7011

    Teaching Period

    Autumn

    Duration

    12 weeks

    Pre-requisite

    No

    Core/Optional

    Core

    Media & Broadcast Production Dissertation

    Overview

    This module comprises independent research on a topic that develops from the taught modular coursework. The dissertation will reflect the background of work conducted across the first two semesters. To that extent, the topic of the dissertation may range from, for example, a more theoretically-based exploration of broadcast literacy, to a more practice-based broadcast output, or it may inhere in a synthesis of both approaches.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of the module students will:
    • have a developed critical understanding of the study of Broadcast Literacy;
    • have developed the skills needed to conduct an independent line of research;
    • be able to organise and develop a complex argument into which detailed points are judiciously integrated;
    • be able to write a cogent, well-illustrated dissertation, which displays originality in terms of consistent thinking and application of ideas, concepts and theories;
    • be able to use appropriate resources to investigate research questions or support findings;
    • be able to write a dissertation which adheres to scholarly norms of presentation and reference.

    Skills

    On successful completion of the module students will:
    • have had the opportunity to explore, to investigate and to identify themes for research within the field of Broadcast Literacy.
    • be able to draw from a variety of analytical and production techniques
    • be able to make use of theoretical, historical, and intellectual contexts
    • be able to examine and evaluate a given research problem.

    Coursework

    100%

    Examination

    0%

    Practical

    0%

    (Video) BA Broadcast Production | Queen's University Belfast
    Credits

    60

    Module Code

    BCP7006

    Teaching Period

    Summer

    Duration

    12 weeks

    Pre-requisite

    No

    Core/Optional

    Core

    Broadcast Journalism

    Overview

    This module introduces students to the skills required to produce broadcast material. Using practical sessions, it teaches industry standard broadcast gathering skills. Students will learn the technological skills needed to operate digital recorders and edit sound, as well as the practical skills required to carry out effective interviews and perform pieces to camera. The module also covers the ethical frameworks around producing and broadcasting broadcast material and relates that to the UK regulatory framework. Throughout the module the students will gain an understanding of how the process of newsgathering impacts on broadcast outputs. The module also utilises BBC staff and facilities, giving students a valuable insight into the industry.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completing this module, students should have acquired and be able to demonstrate:

    •A solid understanding of the production process of making a piece of broadcast

    •A solid understanding of the skills required to carry out an effective digital recording.

    •Strong story ideation and pitching skills
    Development of specific writing skills for broadcast.

    •Development of editing conventions and aesthetics for broadcast

    •Development of interview skills

    Skills

    This module will develop the specific skill in written and oral communication and presentation needed for broadcast. Students will develop skills in identifying story ideas for possible production and in planning and completing reporting project(s).

    Module Code

    BCP7005

    Teaching Period

    Autumn

    Duration

    12 weeks

    Pre-requisite

    No

    Core/Optional

    Core

    Broadcasting Genre (20 credits)

    Broadcasting Genre

    Overview

    This module examines the uses and significance of genre in broadcasting. It covers theories of genre, the relationships between genre in different media (including literature and cinema), and the uses of genre by broadcasters, producers and audiences. Through the module, students will develop their own case studies focusing on a genre of their choice. They will engage with questions around how genres are formed and used, why people categorise things in genres, how genres interact with policy and taste formations and how generic descriptions and canons change over time.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completing this module students should have acquired and be able to demonstrate:
    - a solid understanding of theories of genre in relation to broadcasting;
    - an ability to engage with critical debates around broadcasting and genre;
    - appropriate research and analysis skills relating to broadcasting and genre;
    - development of their scholarly writing and communication skills.

    Skills

    This module will refine and develop students’ skills in analysing texts within various cultural, historical and industrial contexts, as well as in their written communication skills. Students will develop skills in identifying topics for further research and in planning and completing an independent research project.

    Coursework

    100%

    Examination

    0%

    Practical

    0%

    Credits

    20

    Module Code

    BCP7003

    (Video) Broadcast Production Subject Talk | Queen's University Belfast

    Teaching Period

    Spring

    Duration

    12 weeks

    Pre-requisite

    No

    Core/Optional

    Core

    Media & Broadcast Analysis

    Overview

    This module introduces students to the academic analysis of broadcasting. In doing so, the aim is to provide students with an understanding of a range of different methods for conducting their own research, and for understanding other academics’ research. Students will be introduced to the analysis of audience and of broadcast brand. The historical development of broadcasting in Britain will be covered, including consideration of the idea of public service broadcasting, and how it has changed in response to commercial pressures, and the development of on-demand broadcasting. Students should provide their own examples of programming and material, but will also be supplied with examples, including archival material, audience research, etc..Assessment is based upon an essay, with the subject determined by the student in consultation with the supervisor.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completing this module, students should have acquired and be able to demonstrate:
    A solid understanding of methods of analysing broadcast texts and the structures surrounding them, including audience response.
    A solid understanding of the context of British broadcasting in particular, and how this can be related to other national and international broadcasting systems.

    Skills

    This module will refine and develop students’ skills in analysing texts within various cultural, historical and industrial contexts, as well as in their written and oral communication and presentation skills. Students will develop skills in identifying topics for further research and in planning and completing an independent research project.

    Coursework

    100%

    Examination

    0%

    Practical

    0%

    Credits

    20

    Module Code

    BCP7004

    Teaching Period

    Autumn

    Duration

    12 weeks

    Pre-requisite

    No

    Core/Optional

    Core

    Optional Modules

    Interactive Media (20 credits)

    Interactive Media

    Overview

    This module introduces the production of interactive and non-linear forms of new media as emergent alternatives to traditional linear forms of media.

    New media is explored through both a practical exploration of interactive formats; and by considering critical debates around aesthetics, power, force, significance and form in a series of new media texts, artefacts and systems.

    The module situates practices in an environment that is ceaselessly evolving and explores new technologies such as virtual reality, immersive media and interactive documentary for web/mobile devices.

    This module offers a practical introduction to software authoring tools and an exploration of disruptive new technologies as they emerge.

    Learning Outcomes

    1. Critical awareness of digital media systems as innovative cultural forms and contemporary debates around technology and culture

    2. Understanding of new media aesthetics, use, medium theory and form through practice

    3. Engagement with non-linear storytelling devices

    4. Awareness of emerging tools and platforms for creation of interactive content

    5. Applied experience and engagement through practice in the production of interactive media projects.

    Skills

    The module will equip students with the necessary production skills and theoretical frameworks to explore and deliver projects that move away from linear production processes. This grounding will provide students with basic authoring skills, will give them the capacity to develop their skills further through individual study, and will also equip them to think critically about the forms and contents of contemporary media systems that originate online and reside naively on the web.

    Coursework

    30%

    Examination

    0%

    Practical

    70%

    Credits

    20

    Module Code

    BCP7007

    Teaching Period

    Spring

    Duration

    12 weeks

    (Video) Fresh Perspective (FULL PROGRAM) - Floor Manager & VT Production Manager Credit
    Pre-requisite

    No

    Core/Optional

    Optional

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Entry Requirements

Entrance requirements

Graduate
Normally a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification acceptable to the University in an Arts, Humanities or Social Sciences subject.

Applicants with qualifications below 2.1 Honours degree standard may be considered if they can demonstrate appropriate relevant experience. The University's Recognition of Prior Learning Policy provides guidance on the assessment of experiential learning (RPEL). Please visit http://go.qub.ac.uk/RPLpolicy for more information.

Applicants are advised to apply as early as possible and ideally no later than 11th August 2023 for courses which commence in late September. In the event that any programme receives a high number of applications, the University reserves the right to close the application portal. Notifications to this effect will appear on the Direct Application Portal against the programme application page.

International Students

Our country/region pages include information on entry requirements, tuition fees, scholarships, student profiles, upcoming events and contacts for your country/region. Use the dropdown list below for specific information for your country/region.

English Language Requirements

Evidence of an IELTS* score of 6.5, with not less than 5.5 in any component, or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University is required. *Taken within the last 2 years.

International students wishing to apply to Queen's University Belfast (and for whom English is not their first language), must be able to demonstrate their proficiency in English in order to benefit fully from their course of study or research. Non-EEA nationals must also satisfy UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) immigration requirements for English language for visa purposes.

For more information on English Language requirements for EEA and non-EEA nationals see: www.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs.

If you need to improve your English language skills before you enter this degree programme, INTO Queen's University Belfast offers a range of English language courses. These intensive and flexible courses are designed to improve your English ability for admission to this degree.

  • Academic English: an intensive English language and study skills course for successful university study at degree level
  • Pre-sessional English: a short intensive academic English course for students starting a degree programme at Queen's University Belfast and who need to improve their English.

INTO - English Language Course(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

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Fees and Funding

Career Prospects

Introduction
This programme is designed to offer a range of highly useful skills, experience and understanding regarding broadcasting and contemporary media, which are useful in a range of careers, including broadcasting, journalism, marketing, press and public relations, advertising and teaching. Some students choose to continue their studies to PhD level on a chosen specialised topic in Media and Broadcast Production.
http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/careers/

Employment Links
Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.

Additional Awards Gained(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

Prizes and Awards(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

Graduate plus award for extra-curricular skills

In addition to your degree programme, at Queen's you can have the opportunity to gain wider life, academic and employability skills. For example, placements, voluntary work, clubs, societies, sports and lots more. So not only do you graduate with a degree recognised from a world leading university, you'll have practical national and international experience plus a wider exposure to life overall. We call this Graduate Plus. It's what makes studying at Queen's University Belfast special.

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Fees and Funding

Tuition Fees

Northern Ireland (NI) 1£6,980
Republic of Ireland (ROI) 2£6,980
England, Scotland or Wales (GB) 1£8,360
EU Other 3£19,100
International£19,100

1 EU citizens in the EU Settlement Scheme, with settled status, will be charged the NI or GB tuition fee based on where they are ordinarily resident. Students who are ROI nationals resident in GB will be charged the GB fee.

2 EU students who are ROI nationals resident in ROI are eligible for NI tuition fees.

3 EU Other students (excludes Republic of Ireland nationals living in GB, NI or ROI) are charged tuition fees in line with international fees.

All tuition fees quoted are for the academic year 2023-24, and relate to a single year of study unless stated otherwise. Tuition fees will be subject to an annual inflationary increase, unless explicitly stated otherwise.

More information on postgraduate tuition fees.

Additional course costs

All Students

Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs which are not covered by tuition fees, which students will need to consider when planning their studies.

Students can borrow books and access online learning resources from any Queen's library. If students wish to purchase recommended texts, rather than borrow them from the University Library, prices per text can range from £30 to £100. Students should also budget between £30 to £75 per year for photocopying, memory sticks and printing charges.

Students undertaking a period of work placement or study abroad, as either a compulsory or optional part of their programme, should be aware that they will have to fund additional travel and living costs.

If a programme includes a major project or dissertation, there may be costs associated with transport, accommodation and/or materials. The amount will depend on the project chosen. There may also be additional costs for printing and binding.

Students may wish to consider purchasing an electronic device; costs will vary depending on the specification of the model chosen.

There are also additional charges for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

Media and Broadcast Production costs

There are no specific additional course costs associated with this programme

How do I fund my study?

The Department for the Economy will provide a tuition fee loan of up to £5,500 per NI / EU student for postgraduate study. Tuition fee loan information.

A postgraduate loans system in the UK offers government-backed student loans of up to £10,609 for taught and research Masters courses in all subject areas. Criteria, eligibility, repayment and application information are available on the UK government website.

More information on funding options and financial assistance.

International Scholarships

Information on scholarships for international students, is available at www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-scholarships.

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Apply

How to Apply

Apply using our online Postgraduate Applications Portal and follow the step-by-step instructions on how to apply.

Apply now

When to Apply

The deadline for applications is normally 30th June 2021. In the event that any programme receives a high volume of applications, the university reserves the right to close the application portal earlier than 30th June deadline. Notifications to this effect will appear on the Direct Entry Portal (DAP) against the programme application page.

Terms and Conditions

The terms and conditions that apply when you accept an offer of a place at the University on a taught programme of study.
Queen's University Belfast Terms and Conditions.

Download a prospectus

FAQs

What is MA in media Studies? ›

What is an MA in Media? It's a higher education degree that combines the disciplines of media and cultural studies to help students gain the knowledge necessary to work in places like newsrooms, public affairs offices, or marketing firms.

What is MA in media and Communication? ›

MA in Media and Communication - Overview

The two-year postgraduate degree program exposes students to theoretical, aesthetic, critical and technological processes involved in various stages of media production.

Whats broadcast production? ›

The major in broadcast production focuses on the skills required to produce, direct, and operate complex video equipment for multi-camera sports, news, musical performances, and other reality-based programs in the studio or on location.

Is broadcast production marketable in Kenya? ›

So, is journalism marketable in Kenya? Well, the short answer is: it is still marketable but not as it used to be in earlier years.

Is an MA higher than a degree? ›

A Masters is a step up from a Bachelors degree, requiring students to engage in more advanced research methods and independent study while focusing on a particular subject specialism.

Is MA a good degree? ›

Earning your master's degree has many advantages. It can lead to higher salaries, advanced career opportunities, higher-level subject knowledge, and a feeling of accomplishment. But embarking on a master's degree takes time and money.

Is a media and communications masters worth it? ›

Yes, a communication degree is worth it for many students. Media and communication jobs are projected to grow at a rate of 4% in the next 10 years (Bureau of Labor Statistics). Common careers in this field include film and video editors, announcers, public relations, news reporters, and authors.

Can I get a job after MA in Mass Communication? ›

After graduation, they can work as a TV anchor, Journalist, Screenwriter, News Editor, Video Jockey, Radio Jockey, Cameraman, Photographer, etc.

Is a masters in Mass Communication worth it? ›

A masters degree in Mass Communication is worth giving a try for the ones who want to pursue a career in the field of journalism and advertising. After doing Masters in mass communication, you are exposed to numerous opportunities.

What are the 5 types of broadcast media? ›

The term 'broadcast media' covers a wide spectrum of different communication methods such as television, radio, newspapers, magazines and any other materials supplied by the media and press.

What are the two types of broadcast media? ›

The two types of broadcast media are video and audio. Video uses images and is popular means of communicating on television and the internet. Audio is a verbal account and is used on radio, television, and the internet.

Is broadcasting a good career? ›

Broadcasting is a challenging and competitive field, but it can be extremely rewarding and fulfilling. As in every field of study, you must make sure you are ready to handle the demands of a future career in broadcast.

What are top 10 courses? ›

  • MBA & DBA. Executive MBA SSBM.
  • Data Science. PGP in Data Science and Business Analytics Program from Maryland. ...
  • M.Sc in Machine Learning & AI – LJMU & IIT M.
  • Management. PMP Certification Training | PMP Online Course. ...
  • Digital Marketing. ACP in Customer Centricity.
  • Software Technology. ...
  • Business Analytics Certification Program.
6 Oct 2022

What can I do with a broadcast production degree? ›

Broadcast production majors can look forward to careers including:
  • Technical director.
  • Floor director.
  • Producer.
  • Lighting technician.
  • Camera operator.
  • Floor directors.

Is becoming an MA hard? ›

While it does take some hard work, determination, and plenty of focus, the road to becoming a medical assistant is not impossible. Medical assisting, rather, is one of the most straightforward paths to a career in the healthcare field. In fact, it is now easier than ever to become a medical assistant!

Is being an MA worth it? ›

Becoming a medical assistant is a good career choice because it is an in-demand career with many opportunities. The demand for medical assistants is expected to increase by 18.9 percent between 2020 and 2030, which is faster than average compared to other occupations.

What do you call someone with a MA degree? ›

The official title is "Master of xxx" for someone who has attained a Master's degree in a given topic.

Is an MA better than a PhD? ›

After earning a master's degree, the next step is a PhD, which entails both working and performing research at an institution. A PhD is an abbreviation for “Doctor of Philosophy.” It is the highest academic degree one can achieve.

Is a 1 year master's degree worth it? ›

If there is a clear goal in your mind and you are content in your field, a one-year Masters programme is a great choice. People with longer work experience and a proven quantitative aptitude tend to prefer this type of programme, because they can handle the intensity of the coursework.

Which MA is best for future? ›

Best Graduate Degrees for the Future
  • Marketing.
  • Human resources.
  • Business ethics.
  • Business law.
  • Accounting.
  • Finance.
  • Economics.
  • Business policies.

What is the highest paying job in communications? ›

Highest Earning Jobs for Graduates with a Communications Degree. With an average salary of $176,126 per year, chief executives and legislators top the list of highest-earning jobs for communications majors, followed by sales managers with $125,577 per year and advertising sales agents with $111,521.

Is it worth studying media studies? ›

Media Studies graduates can find job opportunities in Marketing, Broadcasting, Photography, and other areas. While the list is long, here are some of the most popular Media Studies careers and the average annual salaries in the United States, according to Glassdoor: Digital Marketing Specialist – 60,000 USD.

Is media and communications a hard major? ›

But remember, being a Comm major comes with a lot of responsibility, which includes constantly explaining to people that it is not just about talking or public speaking, and it is definitely not the easiest major.

What is the highest salary of mass communication? ›

Mass Communication Salary
PercentileSalaryLocation
25th Percentile Mass Communication Salary$54,351US
50th Percentile Mass Communication Salary$61,505US
75th Percentile Mass Communication Salary$69,587US
90th Percentile Mass Communication Salary$76,946US
1 more row

Does mass communication pay well? ›

Typically as a fresher in mass communication, one can earn between INR 12,000 to INR 25,000 per month, depending on the job profile and location. However, an expert having about five years of experience can get a salary starting from INR 50,000 per month to more than INR 1 Lakh per month.

Which is better journalism or mass communication? ›

Unlike mass communication, which aims to entertain the audience, journalism focuses on reporting news in its most accurate form. Further, journalism is mainly about the news, but mass communication includes a broad range of media. They work with politics, economics, business, science, sports, or entertainment news.

Which country is best to study Mass Communication? ›

Study Mass Communication in UK

The country is also known as the media capital of Europe and is on the top list of the best countries to study mass communication.

Which country is best for Mass Communication program? ›

The United Kingdom

A significant factor that makes the UK one of the top countries to study communication abroad is the availability of many world-renowned scholarships. London School of Economics, Goldsmiths, University of London, University of Westminster, City University of London, Loughborough University.

Is mass media and communication a good career? ›

Is mass communication a good career? Yes, it is. Mass communication is promising career-wise. With a mass comm qualification, you can choose to apply for various jobs including radio announcer, public relations practitioner, journalist, and many others.

What is the disadvantages of broadcast media? ›

DISADVANTAGES OF BROADCAST MEDIA

It takes a pretty penny to secure a spot on prime-time television and radio. It's competitive and challenging to get the attention of decision-makers. It might be harder for new companies without street-cred to get featured.

How do I write a broadcast script? ›

Television and Radio News Writing Structure
  1. Be brief. ...
  2. Use correct grammar. ...
  3. Put the important information first. ...
  4. Write good leads. ...
  5. Stick to short sentences of 20 words or less. ...
  6. Write the way people talk. ...
  7. Use contractions. ...
  8. Use simple subject-verb-object sentence structures.

Why it is called broadcast media? ›

The term broadcasting evolved from its use as the agricultural method of sowing seeds in a field by casting them broadly about. It was later adopted for describing the widespread distribution of information by printed materials or by telegraph.

What are the 7 types of media? ›

Modern media comes in many different formats, including print media (books, magazines, newspapers), television, movies, video games, music, cell phones, various kinds of software, and the Internet.

What is broadcast media in simple words? ›

What is broadcast media? Broadcast media involves electronically and simultaneously sending information containing signals, print messages and audio or video content to a vast group of recipients using television, radio, newspapers, magazines and digital media including the Internet, emails and texts.

What are the 3 C's of broadcast writing? ›

All good screenwriting incorporates the Three C's whenever possible: CLEAR, CONCISE, and CREATIVE.

What are the 6 types of broadcast media? ›

 Six methods of broadcasting (Telephone, Radio, Television, Cable , Satellite, Web)  Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video content or other messages to a dispersed audience via any electronic mass communications medium, but typically one using the electromagnetic spectrum (radio waves), in a one-to- ...

What are the advantages of broadcast media? ›

Broadcast media
  • allows for active demonstration of product.
  • large national audience reach (network)
  • large local audience reach.
  • messages stand alone.
  • some audience targeting.
  • prime source of news.
  • high impact.
  • spectacular medium – sound, animation, motion, colour etc.

How much is a broadcaster paid? ›

While ZipRecruiter is seeing annual salaries as high as $122,000 and as low as $17,500, the majority of Television Broadcasting salaries currently range between $40,000 (25th percentile) to $79,500 (75th percentile) with top earners (90th percentile) making $100,000 annually across the United States.

Do broadcasters make money? ›

Broadcasters make money largely through on-air advertising as well as fees to third parties for content retransmission. Cable networks provide content to distributors, including cable, telecommunications, and satellite operators. They also make money selling air time for advertisements.

What skills do you need for broadcasting? ›

Broadcasters - Skills and Abilities
  • Speak clearly so listeners can understand.
  • Read and understand work-related materials.
  • Understand spoken information.
  • Listen to others and ask questions.
  • Understand written information.
  • Write clearly so other people can understand.

What is the most useful degree? ›

25 of the most valuable majors for college students
  • Biomedical engineering. ...
  • Computer science. ...
  • Marine engineering. ...
  • Pharmaceutical sciences. ...
  • Computer engineering. ...
  • Electrical engineering. ...
  • Finance. ...
  • Software engineering.

What is the easiest course? ›

CollegeVine's Top Easiest Majors
  1. Business Administration. Average GPA: 3.2.
  2. Psychology. Average GPA: 3.3. ...
  3. Education. Average GPA: 3.6. ...
  4. Social Work. Average GPA: 3.4. ...
  5. Public Relations & Advertising. Average GPA: 3.0. ...
  6. Criminal Justice. Average GPA: 3.1. ...
  7. Journalism. Average GPA: 3.2. ...
  8. Economics. Average GPA: 3.0. ...
24 Jun 2021

How do I get a job in broadcast? ›

The qualifications you need to get a job as an entry-level broadcaster typically include a bachelor's degree in broadcasting, journalism, or mass communications. Some colleges offer more specific diplomas, such as sports broadcasting, which is good if you want to specialize in a niche.

Is film and media a good major? ›

Not only does film school help you in the field, but it can also aid in your post-graduate job hunt. Listing a film degree on your resume can increase your chances of being hired by a production company, editing house, or writer's room. This is because employers recognize the skills it takes to complete a film program.

How much money do film producers make? ›

How much does a Film Producer make? Film producers make $50,185 per year on average, or $24.13 per hour, in the United States. Film producers on the lower end of that spectrum, the bottom 10% to be exact, make roughly $30,000 a year, while the top 10% makes $81,000.

What does an MA course mean? ›

Put simply, an MA (Master of Arts) is usually an arts-based course, while an MSc (Master of Sciences) degree is usually science or research based.

What does MA study mean? ›

The Master of Arts (MA) degree is a graduate-level degree focused on fields of study like the humanities, fine arts, and social sciences. It's one of the most common master's degrees students earn, along with the Master of Science (MS).

What does MA mean in journalism? ›

, M.A. in Journalism, or M.S. in Journalism) is a master's degree awarded to students who have studied journalism at a graduate level. Like other master's degree programs, master of journalism programs are typically between one and two years.

What do you do in media studies? ›

Media studies undergraduates can expect the following tasks during their studies:
  • writing reports and essays.
  • presentations and pitches.
  • film, music and creative projects.
  • attending lectures and seminars.
  • hearing from industry speakers.
  • placements and industry experience.
  • project and teamwork.

Is an MA better than a MSc? ›

An MA is a terminal degree

The MA is a terminal degree while an MSc isn't. A terminal degree is usually the highest type of degree that an individual can receive in his or her field. While an MSc is usually a degree that prepares students for working on doctoral degrees,” writes Nikita Das for Eduopinions.com.

How difficult is a Masters degree? ›

It's not easy. And not everyone who attempts a Master's program will actually complete their degree. Below are some of the most common hurdles to success we've seen. Procrastinators will quickly find that the constant, high volume of reading, writing, and research means that falling behind is not an option.

Is an MA better than a BA? ›

Is It Better To Get a Bachelor's Degree or a Master's Degree? Both a bachelor's degree and a master's degree can offer rewarding learning and career opportunities. However, you may consider it advantageous to earn a master's degree if it aligns with your personal goals and is required in your career field.

What is a good mark at Masters level? ›

The boundaries for these may vary depending on your university, but as a general rule: Distinction - 70%+ Merit - 60% Pass - 50%

Is it worth doing a journalism masters? ›

A master's in journalism will stretch you, and it will give you both practical and intellectual development. If you want a career in journalism in london or the UK, or if you want to critically study the journalism industry, either a vocational or more theoretical programme will most definitely be worth it.

How do I become a journalist after MA? ›

Students can pursue a major in Journalism or Communications or a diploma course in journalism. However, a bachelor's degree in journalism and mass communication (BJMC) is the most preferred course to become a journalist in India. After graduation, they can take up a master's course in journalism or mass communication.

Which country is best for masters in journalism? ›

Best countries to study journalism
  • Journalism in USA.
  • Journalism in UK.
  • Journalism in Canada.
  • Journalism in New Zealand.
  • Journalism in Ireland.
  • Journalism in Spain.
  • Journalism in Fiji.
  • Journalism in Cyprus.

Is media a level hard? ›

Due to the range of media texts, and the depth of the media framework required to analyse these texts, it is tough to do well in A level Media Studies in one year.

Which field is best in media? ›

We ranked the best careers in media and communication for 2021 using salary and projected job growth rate data from the BLS.
  • Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers. ...
  • Art Directors. ...
  • Technical Writers. ...
  • Writers and Authors. ...
  • Editors. ...
  • Public Relations Specialists. ...
  • Film and Video Editors and Camera Operators.
13 Oct 2022

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